Portfolio > The IMNDN Exhibition Series

There is often a preconceived notion of what Native art is, romantic imagery of Native artists practicing their craft, unchanged for hundreds of years, frozen in time in a sepia toned photograph.
This exhibition series expands visitors’ horizons with works by a variety of contemporary Native artists who are reinventing the concept of what contemporary Native art is. Exploring Native mythologies, colonization, and identity, with clear vision and lacking romantic overtures, these artists embody the idea of what it means to be a Native artist in the 21st Century.
Why focus on contemporary Native art? Much time, effort, thought and funding has been dedicated to rebuilding Native arts, language and traditions in order to heal cultural wounds, but less attention has been given to the continued growth, expansion and future of Native arts and culture.
The past and tradition are important, but we must look to the future in order to assure that Native culture continues to evolve and flourish. In conjunction with the efforts of other organizations focusing on relearning and reviving Native culture, IMNDN is dedicated to healing cultural wounds by focusing primarily on contemporary Native art and artists. It is from here we believe we will be able to assure the continuation and growth of Native cultures.
One of the primary goals of IMNDN is to proactively advocate for Native artists by exposing their work to and engaging with the public to help Native artists achieve greater recognition, respect, and ultimately a place in the mainstream art world. Native artists, especially contemporary Native artists, do not have the same opportunities to gain recognition, respect, support, or economic viability that non-Native artists do. Artists need the exposure generated by exhibition openings and events. And, artists need consumers in order to generate income from sales of their work, for recognition and acceptance, and for the development of a following of admiring collectors.